QRR News: What's up Doc?

Lady Sybile is adopted!

 

Our charming Lady Sybile was adopted today by her foster home where she was staying since last October. Lady Sybile was born February 2012 and was abandoned in April 2012 at the Montreal SPCA. Since March 2014 Quebec Rabbit Rescue took over her care. Her adoptive home is very attentive to her needs by having a setup that allows her to climb, something that she loves to do. Congratulations to Lady Sybile and we wish much happiness to her adoptive home!

 

Lady Sybile

February 22, 2015
Our Next Adoption Clinic, February 14, 2015

 

Adoption clinic & nail trimming 10$, to the benefit the rabbits of Quebec Rabbit Rescue.

February 14, 2014 from 10.00am to 14:00pm.

At Global Pitou, Minou et compagnon (Plaza Pointe-Claire) 245 boul. St-Jean, Pointe-Claire, Québec.

Also jewelry, apple treats and toys for bunnies!

Come and meet our wonderful bunnies for adoption. Benjamin and Monsieur Waesley.

 

 

Benjamin Lapin

February 9, 2015
Thank you for your support!

 

The dried fruit bags sale for the holiday period has raised 219$!


Thank you to all who came and purchased some bags at our adoption clinic,who ordered some and purchase some at the Hôpital Oiseaux & Animaux Exotiques Montreal Bird & Exotic Animal Hospital.


This will help cover the costs of neutering our rabbits and Monsieur Weasley and Benjamin.

 

 

 

Fruits Seches

January 17, 2015

Quebec Rabbit Rescue is run by volunteers and rescues abandoned domestic rabbits. Working with the animal shelters in the greater Montreal area, our organization offers bunnies a second chance at finding their forever home.

We spay and neuter all of our rabbits prior to adoption. We are a no kill rescue and always provide appropriate medical care to all of our adorable rabbits! We do not have a shelter location. Therefore, we rely exclusively on foster homes and volunteers to shelter our bunnies until their adoption.

SETTING YOUR PET RABBIT LOOSE DOESN'T MAKE HER FREE

IT MAKES HER FOOD.
Domestic rabbits lack the survival instincts wild rabbits use to fend for themselves. So they become food for everything from raccoons and dogs to crows and hawks. And the "lucky" ones who don't get eaten get run over by cars or die from weather exposure or disease. Please, before getting a bunny - or abandoning one - consult these articles Reasons Not to Get a Rabbit and Finding a Home for an Unwanted Rabbit published by the House Rabbit Society at www.rabbit.org or contact your local humane society.

IT MAKES HER FOOD.


Looking out the window

 

Domestic rabbits lack the survival instincts wild rabbits use to fend for themselves. So they become food for everything from raccoons and dogs to crows and hawks. And the "lucky" ones who don't get eaten get run over by cars or die from weather exposure or disease. Please, before getting a bunny - or abandoning one - consult these articles: Reasons Not to Get a Rabbit (PDF) and Finding a Home for an Unwanted Rabbit published by the House Rabbit Society at www.rabbit.org or contact your local humane society.